Syria’s Alawites

A fantastic article here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/23/magazine/the-price-of-loyalty-in-syria.html?pagewanted=8&_r=0&hp&pagewanted=all

 

The Alawite faith, developed a millennium ago, is a strange, mystic blend of Neoplatonism, Christianity, Islam and Zoroastrianism. It included a belief in reincarnation and a deification of Ali, the cousin and son-in-law of the Prophet Muhammad. These unorthodox tenets may have led the crusaders and other outsiders to favor them, seeing them as potential allies against Muslims. The theologian Ibn Taymiyya — the ancestor of today’s hard-line Islamists — proclaimed in the early 1300s that the Alawites were “more infidel than Jews and Christians, even more infidel than many polytheists,” and urged good Muslims to slaughter and rob them. The Alawites sought shelter in the mountains, and rarely dared to come even to Latakia. Many of them were slaughtered by Ottoman armies, and parts of the community stood close to extinction at some points in their history. According to the historian Joshua Landis, as late as the 1870s, supposed Alawite bandits were impaled on spikes and left on crossroads as a warning. They lived in desperate poverty on the margins of Syria’s feudal economy, often sending their daughters into indentured servitude as maids to wealthy Sunni families.

In 1936, when the French were poised to merge the newly formed Alawite coastal state into a larger Syrian republic, six Alawite notables sent a petition begging them to reconsider. “The spirit of hatred and fanaticism embedded in the hearts of the Arab Muslims against everything that is non-Muslim has been perpetually nurtured by the Islamic religion,” they wrote. “There is no hope that the situation will ever change. Therefore, the abolition of the mandate will expose the minorities in Syria to the dangers of death and annihilation, irrespective of the fact that such abolition will annihilate the freedom of thought and belief.” One of the petition’s signers was Sulayman al-Assad, the grandfather of Syria’s current president.”

Another tantalizing thought is what would have happened to Syria had Bashar’s elder brother Bassel, who died in a car crash in 1994, been able to succeed his father. Clearly, if nothing else, a more charismatic figure than Bashar:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bassel_al-Assad


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One thought on “Syria’s Alawites

  1. well I have to correct some concept you have here “These unorthodox tenets may have led the crusaders and other outsiders to favor them, seeing them as potential allies against Muslims.” Alawites are considered as Muslims too since they believe in prophet Muhammad. I think you wanted to say Sunnis instead of Muslims, as you know there are like many sects and parts here and Islam is not all about Sunnis or Wahabis.

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